Diana's Neighborhood

Real Estate in New York & Connecticut – Won't you be my neighbor?

SQUANTZ POND – New Fairfield and Sherman, CT

Connecticut’s State Park – SQUANTZ POND in New Fairfield, CT  and Sherman, CT is opened from Memorial Day to Labor Day from 8am to 6:30pm for swimming, fishing, boating, scuba diving and picnicking.

The 172 acres are surrounded by mountains with hiking trails, a beach area and is a delight to photographers all year round.

History of Squantz Pond by Wikipedia:

Settlers from Fairfield, Connecticut received approval from the General Assembly to establish a new township and they negotiated with Chief Squantz of the Schaghticoke (tribe), a tribe of Algonquianlineage. They “purchased” a 32,000 acre (130 km²) tract of land, that is now New Fairfield and Sherman, for the equivalent of about 300 dollars and on April 24, 1729, The deed was recorded on May 9,1729, and is now deposited in the archives of the State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut.

It is said that Squantz Pond State Park takes its name from Chief Squantz who lived at the northern tip of the lake, which is now separated from the rest of Candlewood Lake by the Route 39 causeway. Before becoming a state park, the area around Squantz Pond was also a farm and an apple orchard. Despite many changes to the land, the presence of the original residents is still marked by occasionally uncovered artifacts such as stone adzes, mallets and other tools. The remains of an Indian canoe over 22 feet long and 5 feet wide was raised from the bottom of the lake, leading to speculation that even before the settlers came, Squantz Pond may have been much larger than it was just prior to its expansion during the flooding of Candlewood Lake.

SQUANTZ POND – a wonderful place for the family.  While visiting, please swim in the designated areas and have fun!

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?

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June 20, 2008 - Posted by | Connecticut, New Fairfield, Sherman, Squantz Pond, Uncategorized | , , , , , , ,

5 Comments »

  1. We used to camp @ squantz pond in the 40’s and 50’s as a family. My dads family camped there in the 30’s and 40’s.I remember my dad telling me that as a boy he could swim partly across the lake and sit on a chimney that was in the middle of the lake. Does anyone know about this?.I believe he said that when the lake was created it covered some houses. I’d like to know about this. Remember, I was just a young boy when I heard this.If anybody has this information ,please share it thanks Ken Brown

    Comment by Ken Brown | May 7, 2010 | Reply

    • I’m sure you have wonderful memories – I wish many times to be able to go back in time… even just for a day! I looked up info on Squantz Pond through Wikipedia. Here is what they said – Settlers from Fairfield, Connecticut received approval from the General Assembly to establish a new township and they negotiated with Chief Squantz of the Schaghticoke (tribe), a tribe of Algonquian lineage. They “purchased” a 32,000 acre (130 km²) tract of land, that is now New Fairfield and Sherman, for the equivalent of about 300 dollars and on April 24, 1729, The deed was recorded on May 9, 1729, and is now deposited in the archives of the State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut.

      It is said that Squantz Pond State Park takes its name from Chief Squantz who lived at the northern tip of the lake, which is now separated from the rest of Candlewood Lake by the Route 39 causeway. Before becoming a state park, the area around Squantz Pond was also a farm and an apple orchard. Despite many changes to the land, the presence of the original residents is still marked by occasionally uncovered artifacts such as stone adzes, mallets and other tools. The remains of an Indian canoe over 22 feet long and 5 feet wide was raised from the bottom of the lake, leading to speculation that even before the settlers came, Squantz Pond may have been much larger than it was just prior to its expansion during the flooding of Candlewood Lake.

      Hope this helps!

      ~ Diana ~

      Comment by dianasantos | May 7, 2010 | Reply

    • I found the Candlewood lake info on Wikipedia.

      Comment by Lisa D | June 7, 2010 | Reply

      • Wikipedia is great!

        Comment by dianasantos | June 7, 2010

  2. Maybe your Dad meant Candlewood lake!

    Candlewood Lake was formed behind a hydroelectric dam south of the Rocky River’s junction with the Housatonic River. Similar to a giant battery, its main purpose is to store water during periods of low electrical demand for power generation when demand is high. Excess electricity from the valley’s hydro-system is used to pump water up a hillside into the lake from the nearby Housatonic River during spring, and overnight hours in summer. The water is then allowed to flow back down into the river when extra electricity is needed in the grid, often during the region’s mid-to-late summer heat waves. Power is generated by turbines that are spun by the water flowing into the river while pumping is done by reversing the impellers.

    Candlewood Lake was created in the 1920s. Inhabitants were relocated, but many of the buildings were left standing and some farming equipment was left behind. The roads were not torn up before the valley was flooded. Scuba divers can investigate buildings from that era, following the roads underwater, and discover artifacts from that era. Some of the notable underwater finds are model Ts, plane wreckage from small craft that have hit the lake since then, and covered bridges from that era.

    Comment by Lisa D | June 7, 2010 | Reply


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